“Got any trees?”
eclipse surfboards hushfish model
eclipse surfboards hushfish logo

About the Hushfish model surfboards

the HUSHFISH.
A new shortboard for 2014. Developed throughout 1995 with a variety of team members, such as my self and Andrea “IL MARCIO” Conforti, the Coppola brothers, Ramses Marquetz, il “Gaviota” and much more.
This design incorporates a low entry rocker with an increased tail kick out the back of the board. It has slight concave reverse-vee through the first half of the board, leading into double concave through the fins and out the tail here a present a vee. A good all-around shortboard that surfs fast ‘ and tight for the most progressive performance. Avail­able tail options: wide swallov (without the wingers), and swallow (with the wingers). I suggests the wide tail version of this design for small waves.
“Got any trees?”
eclipse surfboards hushfish model
eclipse surfboards hushfish logo

About the Hushfish model surfboards

the HUSHFISH.
A new shortboard for 2014. Developed throughout 1995 with a variety of team members, such as my self and Andrea “IL MARCIO” Conforti, the Coppola brothers, Ramses Marquetz, il “Gaviota” and much more.
This design incorporates a low entry rocker with an increased tail kick out the back of the board. It has slight concave reverse-vee through the first half of the board, leading into double concave through the fins and out the tail here a present a vee. A good all-around shortboard that surfs fast ‘ and tight for the most progressive performance. Avail­able tail options: wide swallov (without the wingers), and swallow (with the wingers). I suggests the wide tail version of this design for small waves.
spec5
  • FEATURED BOARD DIMENSION: 5’8” x 18”3/4 x 2”3/8.
  • BOTTOM SHAPE: panel vee on nose/ deep concave in the middle that blend with a deep double concave / panel vee out the tail
  • NOSE: Shaped
  • ROCKER: All
  • TAIL: For
  • ROCKER: You
  • GLASSING: 4 oz. full bottom; 2x 4 oz. on deck
  • FINS: Thruster or quad / fcs system
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    EXTRA :

    Designed for: Upside down! Loose lips and sick rips! / Low entry far ease of paddling and groveling / decreased outline curve / greater forgiveness / Swallow tail, capable of gouging mad-rail carves / nose vee to Concave to double concave – vee off the tail for optimal speed and maneuverability / double concave on deck for your confort / All U need R the waves!
    wave-size
    knee surf :
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    medium surf:
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    head high :
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    over head :
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    double over head :
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    all
    hushfish_shortboards_eclipse_surfboards_winger

    the wings

    fucsia_solo

    adding the wing to the rail it would add more planing area, but you’d still have a narrow tail for in the pocket and bigger waves. The ‘wing/flyer’ had to be pinched to allow the rail to stay in the wave and run you higher as well (á la Bunker’s idea). But, the wing also gave you a break point for snapping out of the lip. So, three pure benefits: More planing area to get across the flats; pinched wing to stick in the face and ride high on; a break point in the rail to snap off the lip on Wings were not something you created by cutting a piece out of the tail of your board. They were ADDED to the rail line/foil and planshape, and pinched to have minimum effect of rail-line entry but maximum effect on planning area when flat — plus, the increased ability to run high and hold a high line.

    the Bottom Shape

    azulsolo

    eclipse_surfboard_hushfish_bottom_shape_2
    It’s a funny thing…
    I use this magic combination from my very early surfboards (thanks even to Ale “BRETELLA” Bertel )… without know too much about Simmons …or so….
    But… a little background: Concaves in surfboard bottoms have been around since Bob Simmons introduced them in approximately 1946. Some big-wave guns from the late ’50s and early ’60s have concave in the bottoms, all the way through the tails.

    Concave Bottoms

    The most definitive and conclusive statement ever made about concave bottoms is this: “Make no generalizations about concaves!” Concaves are likely the most complicated, questioned and debated element of surfboard design theory, yet they are probably the most commonly utilized design feature on modern surfboard bottoms. Concaves come in many shapes and sizes, have a number of effects on performance, and are used on most surfboard types in different variations and combinations. Unfortunately, most shapers have little idea about how concaves work, their knowledge of the design element restricted to feedback from riders, other shapers, personal perceptions, and the utter void of scientific research on the topic that is available, applicable, and comprehendible by general surfing public. With this in mind, most of what we assume can be attributable to concaves has been deduced from what we have indeed learned as a shaping community over the years.

    Double concave

    Most modern performance thrusters use some kind of single to double concave setup, where the single concave is shaped first, and the double is shaped within the single. This puts the bottom rail edge lower than the stringer throughout the entire concave array. Typically, the single concave starts 12-18 inches from the tip of the nose, gradually deepening until it reaches its maximum depth somewhere between the wide point of the board and the midpoint between the wide point and the leading edge of the rail fins. The single then gradually fades out to flat or vee behind the trailing edge of the center fin. The double concaves can begin anywhere, but typically begin to fade in at the point where the single concave is deepest. The double concaves are usually deepest near the leading edge of the rail fins, then either quickly fade to flat or vee at the trailing edge of the center fin, or are run right out the tail block, the latter being more common on fish type boards. Many riders report that changing the length of the double concaves changes the feel of the board – lengthening the doubles gives a greater sense of control at speed and added drive. Shortening the doubles gives a greater sense of lift and responsiveness, but a lesser degree of control at speed. This might be explained by the fact that the further forward the doubles extend, the more the flow of water coming through the single concave is kept separated, reducing the turbulence caused by flow convergence as the template narrows.

    Rocker Alterations

    Because concaves remove material from the bottom of the board, but leave the rail line untouched, all concaves flatten areas of the bottom of the board, either along the stringer, in the case of single concaves, or on either side of the stringer, in the case of double concaves. Flattening the bottom rocker of the board reduces bottom curvature, creating flatter planing area(s) that can help the board plane earlier at lower speeds, and reach higher top end velocities. The deeper and longer the concave(s), the generally flatter the bottom planing areas will become, relative to rail rocker. Obviously, a deep single concave flattens more area than a double concave alone. The single-to-double concave can add even more flattened area than either the single or the double, if the double concave is shaped into a pre-existing single, further flattening an already flattened curve. In any case, this relative increase in rail rocker line allows the board to maintain its turning radius, while providing flatter planing bottom areas, giving the rider a greater sense of both speed and maneuverability.

    the nose / tail panel vee

    the “panel” in the vee refers to the flat sides of the vee which taper down from the stringer, usually all the way to the edge of the rail, in a flat plane. Panel vee is most commonly used in the back third or front third of a board, but may also be used through the middle on some designs. When used in the entry rocker section of the board, the vee helps the board slice through chop much like the hull of a boat. Vee in the entry section also provides some directional stability when current may be in issue, and raises the nose rails slightly. This shortens the length of wetted rail at lower speeds, adds some entry rail rocker for tighter full rail turns, and helps prevent the nose rail from catching when coming around on a top turn. When used in the back third, the vee provides some directional stability and adds rail rocker. The longer and/or deeper the vee, the greater directional stability the board has, and the more rail rocker is added to the tail section of the board. Many people believe that a heavy vee facilitates easy rail-to-rail surfing. However, if the vee in the tail section of the board is deep enough, it adds so much directional stability that the ride becomes sticky and tracky, and the board actually becomes harder to get up onto a rail. Once on a rail, the board will have a tighter turning radius, but there is a considerable loss of sensitivity, particularly on wide-tailed boards, and those that are flat through the middle. Retro fish and the evolutive boards are perfect examples.

    the fins system

    verde

    eclipse_surfboard_glassing_8
    GLASSED-IN

    This type of system is most common in retro, twin-fin boards, but some new boards do still come with glassed-in fins. Aesthetically, having the fins laminated right into the board appears pretty classy, but are there other benefits besides looks alone? If done correctly, glassed-in fins are structurally more sound than removable fins, because the entire base of the fin becomes a part of the board. The laminated fin base also affects the way that the board cuts through the water, so more experienced surfers will notice better performance as well. Now it’s time to get real about the changing face of surfing. Glassed-in fins have become virtually extinct in the shadow of removable fin systems. They are a pain to replace if they break (not to mention expensive, as you’ll need to pay someone to do it for you), they cannot be adjusted in any way, and they make traveling with your surfboard incredibly frustrating. Most shapers have turned their backs on glassed-in fins, instead opting to outfit their boards with newer fin technology. It’s made a big difference. Read on…

    REMOVABLES

    Since the 1960s, shapers have toyed with the idea of removable fin systems. The problems posed by traditional glassed-in fins – they’re hard to fix, ship and stock – finally led to revolutionary advances in fin technology on a mainstream scale. The 1990s saw a widespread shift from laminated fins to removable setups, and the surfing industry hasn’t looked back since. Here’s how it works: instead of permanently attaching the fin itself to the board, a fin box is glassed-in instead. Each fin box has a groove that only matches one particular brand of fin, but surfers can change the style, shape and size at their discretion. With very little effort and a fin “key” (a small screwdriver-like device for securing a fin in its box), it’s possible to completely alter the type and/or number of fins on a board to suit varying surf conditions. Altering fin setups is quick and easy, usually taking less than a minute to complete.
    While it’s great that adjustments, travel, storage and repair have become easier with the introduction of removable fins, there are still drawbacks to the new equipment. The largest issue is, perhaps, coping with the sheer number of possibilities that this system offers. For newbie surfers especially, having to face the endless options associated with a removable fin setup can be daunting and confusing. Luckily, almost every surfboard comes with a set of fins already chosen for you. The shaper is charged with selecting fins that will best achieve the purpose of each board, taking the type of waves and style of riding into consideration.Removable fin systems are easy, customizable, portable and inexpensive – but they aren’t for everyone. Despite their benefits, some shapers and pro surfers refuse to go down that road, claiming that the simplicity and strength of glassed-in fins makes the surfing better. It’s a choice you’ll need to make for yourself, but at least now you know the whole story.

    eclipse_surfboard_glassing_6
    Fin Systems

    Here is a glimpse at a few of the major movers and shakers in the fin industry, and the technologies they’ve introduced that make them unique.

    FIN CONTROL SYSTEMS (FCS)

    Fin Control Systems (better known as FCS) is a leading producer of quality surfboard fins worldwide; in fact, four of the last five surfing world champions were riding FCS fins at the time of their win. They are well made and known for their durability and performance. The key to FCS’s success may be its revolutionary fin-plug design, whereby the fin box is anchored deep into the surfboard, grasping the laminates on both the deck and underside of the board. Most fin plugs are rooted into the foam core alone, then glassed into place using resin. FCS fin plugs are more a part of the surfboard construction, making them far more resilient and less likely to break.The interface between FCS fins and their fin plugs is also unique. Each fin is attached to the board by placing two prongs that stick out of the bottom of the fin into two separate, circular fin plugs. The fins, once screwed into place, are less likely to move laterally (which is a typical complaint regarding fin boxes). The result is a stronger hold back to front and top to bottom. Because their system is completely different from all other fin companies, FCS fins can only be used with FCS fin plugs.

    FUTURE SYSTEMS

    Future fins are another high-quality option for surfers. Unlike FCS’s two-pronged fin plug system, the bases of Future fins are tapered to fit into elongated fin boxes, which are glassed into the board’s bottom. The entire base of the fin is secured in the Future system with an angled screw, meaning that there is a strong hold from back to front. There is still a little wiggle room from side to side, so they need to be secured with a fin key every time you surf for maximum hold. Like FCS fins, Future fins are designed to only work with Future fin boxes. (Future does, however, make replacement fins that are compatible with other companies’ systems, but they are marked as such.)
    the fiberglass and the carbon
    the s-glass

    giallosolo

    This is probably the strongest fiberglass cloth on that is used on surfboards ranging from about 4-6 ounces. It is designed more for high performance custom surfboards and also sail kite boards. Comparing it to the E Glass it shows significant improvements in every aspect of strength including tensile, flexural, and compressive strength. Basically if you are looking for the strongest fiberglass cloth used on custom surfboards you need not look any further. This is made to dominate the resistance and impact category giving you a strong reliable surfboard.
    the carbon patches

    giallosolo

    The patches are designed to add stiffness to the tail in the area of the fins and alter the flex pattern in the back 16-18 inches of the board. Mostly it’s probably just because they look “cool”.
    (just for remember that the carbon fiber works at 100% when is laminated with epoxy resin, put in a sandwich between two layers of fiberglass and after, put the object under vacuum, otherwise the carbon don’t work proprely)

    eclipse_surfboards_blog
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